Multimedia


Animations

Space Weather/Sun-Earth Mission Animation Library

Van Allen Probes Animations

The Van Allen Probes deploy their solar arrays.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (NASA/JHUAPL)

QuickTime Movie (30.80 MB file)

The Van Allen Probes will orbit Earth on similar orbits, ranging from approximately 373 miles (600 km) to 23,000 miles (37,000 km) altitude.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins UniversityApplied Physics Laboratory (NASA/JHUAPL)

QuickTime Movie (33.47 MB file)

A Van Allen Probe deploys the spin plane booms that carry instruments for the Electric Field Wave experiment.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (NASA/JHUAPL)

QuickTime Movie (39.86 MB file)

A Van Allen Probe deploys the stacer booms that hold instruments for the Electric Field Wave experiment.

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (NASA/JHUAPL)

QuickTime Movie (29.15 MB file)

Science Visualizations

This is an animated model of the varied response of the outer radiation belt to geomagnetic activity.

Credit: G. Reeves/LANL

QuickTime Movie (0.5 MB file)

A coronal mass ejection erupts from the Sun, hurtles towards Earth, and interacts with Earth's magnetosphere.

Credit: NASA

QuickTime Movie (2.8 MB file)

This is a demonstration of the motion of a charged particle in the Earth's magnetic field as it gyrates around the field lines, bounces from pole to pole, and drifts around the Earth.

Credit: NASA/JHUAPL

QuickTime Movie (35.4 MB file)

TIMED Animations

TIMED Separation from Launch Vehicle

The dual-payload attach fitting - the mechanism used to hold the TIMED and Jason-1 spacecraft in place during launch - separates in preparation for the TIMED spacecraft to be jettisoned from the Delta II launch vehicle. TIMED is the second of the two spacecraft to be jettisoned.

Within seconds after its separation, TIMED's solar arrays are deployed and the spacecraft begins detumbling - an action that occurs during the course of one orbit cycle to help stabilize the spacecraft.

MPEG Version (2.38 MB file)

QuickTime Version (1.64 MB file)

STEREO Animations

Note: You will need special software to view these files. If you do not already have QuickTime installed, you can download it from www.quicktime.com. Microsoft's MediaPlayer can be used to view MPEG files. Additional MPEG players can be found at www.mpeg.org.

Preparing for Flight: Closing the Launch Vehicle's Fairing

A spacecraft separation system allows one STEREO observatory to sit atop the other within the third stage of the Delta II launch vehicle.

DOWNLOADS:

QuickTime (430 KB)  |  Small MPG (357 KB)  |  Large MPG (540 KB)

Placing STEREO into Orbit

STEREO mission designers determined that the most efficient and cost-effective way to get the twin observatories into space was to launch them aboard a single rocket and use lunar swingbys to place them into their respective orbits. This is the first time lunar swingbys have been used to manipulate orbits of more than one spacecraft. Mission designers will use the moon's gravity to redirect the observatories to their appropriate orbits - something the launch vehicle alone can't do.

After launch, the observatories will fly in an orbit from a point close to Earth to one that extends just beyond the moon. Approximately two months later, mission operations personnel at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), in Laurel, Md., will synchronize spacecraft orbits, directing one observatory to its position trailing Earth in its orbit. Approximately one month later, the second observatory will be redirected to its position ahead of Earth.

DOWNLOADS:

Observatories Separate after Launch

QuickTime (853 KB)  |  Small MPG (765 KB)  |  Large MPG (1.2 M)

Solar Panels Deploy

QuickTime (1.8 M)  |  Small MPG (2 M)  |  Large MPG (3 M)

Gravitational Pull

QuickTime (734 KB)  |  Small MPG (614 KB)  |  Large MPG (949 KB)

Flying Close to Earth

QuickTime (654 KB)  |  Small MPG (508 KB)  |  Large MPG (791 KB)

Lunar Swingby

QuickTime (607 KB)  |  Small MPG (458 KB)  |  Large MPG (706 KB)

Twin STEREO Observatories in their Orbits

The twin observatories will fly as mirror images of each other to obtain unique "stereo" views of the sun's activities. They must be placed into a rather challenging orbit where they're offset from one another. One observatory will be placed ahead of Earth in its orbit around the sun and the other behind. Just as the slight offset between your eyes provides you with depth perception, this placement will allow the STEREO ob­servatories to obtain 3-D images and particle measurements of the sun.

DOWNLOADS:

"Ahead" and "Behind" Observatories

QuickTime (836 KB)  |  Small MPG (765 KB)  |  Large MPG (1.2 M)

"Behind" Observatory

QuickTime (853 KB)  |  Small MPG (768 KB)  |  Large MPG (1.2 M)

"Ahead" Observatory

QuickTime (654 KB)  |  Small MPG (510 KB)  |  Large MPG (786 KB)

Seeing with STEREO

Each twin STEREO observatory will carry two instruments and two instrument suites. This combination provides a total of 16 instruments per observatory. APL is designing and building the spacecraft platform housing the instruments. When combined with data from observatories on the ground or in low-Earth orbit, STEREO's data will allow scientists to track the buildup and liftoff of magnetic energy from the sun and the trajectory of Earth-bound coronal mass ejections in 3-D.

DOWNLOADS:

High-gain Antenna Deployed

QuickTime (919 KB)  |  Small MPG (860 KB)  |  Large MPG (1.3 M)

IMPACT's Boom Deployed

QuickTime (495 KB)  |  Small MPG (306 KB)  |  Large MPG (476 KB)

Pointing at the Sun

QuickTime (853 KB)  |  Small MPG (768 KB)  |  Large MPG (1.2 M)

SECCHI Instrument Suite

QuickTime (443 KB)  |  Small MPG (242 KB)  |  Large MPG (373 KB)

S/WAVES Instrument

QuickTime (416 KB)  |  Small MPG (207 KB)  |  Large MPG (324 KB)

NASA Logo Van Allen Probes Logo

© 2017 The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory LLC. All rights reserved.
11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, Maryland 20723
240-228-5000 (Washington, DC, area) • 443-778-5000 (Baltimore area)