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Array Deployment

The identical Van Allen Probes follow similar orbits that take them through both the inner and outer radiation belts. The highly elliptical orbits range from a minimum altitude of approximately 373 miles (600 kilometers) to a maximum altitude of approximately 23,000 miles (37,000 kilometers).

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File Size: 4 M

Separation

This artist rendering shows the twin Van Allen Probes as they appeared shortly after they separated from their launch vehicle, before they have moved apart from each other and deployed their solar panels and booms.

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SP Booms Flyby

The identical Van Allen Probes follow similar orbits that take them through both the inner and outer radiation belts. The highly elliptical orbits range from a minimum altitude of approximately 373 miles (600 kilometers) to a maximum altitude of approximately 23,000 miles (37,000 kilometers).

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Format: JPG
Print Size: 14 x 7.8
Resolution: 300 dpi
File Size: 3.6 M

Stacer Boom Deploy

Artist rendering of one of the Van Allen Probes with its solar panels and booms deployed. The probes carry identical sets of five instrument suites to support experiments that will address the mission's science objectives.

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File Size: 3.2 M

Radiation Belt

Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Artist rendering showing two spacecraft representing early designs of the Van Allen Probes that are studying the sun and its effects on Earth.

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File Size: 3,605 K

Credit: NASA

Space weather affects technological systems in space and on the Earth's surface.

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File Size: 289 K

Credit: NASA

The source of space weather, our dynamic sun, shown with a coronal mass ejection that will interact with the terrestrial magnetosphere producing geospace storms.

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File Size: 103 K

Credit: NASA

In Earth orbit and in interplanetary space, humans are directly exposed to space weather and its potentially dangerous impact.

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File Size: 1.5 M

Credit: NASA/JHU Applied Physics Laboratory

Artist's concept of the twin STEREO spacecraft studying the sun.

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File Size: 1.5 M

Credit: NASA

This graphic shows the chain of processes coupling the inner magnetosphere's energetic particle environment to solar wind disturbances.

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Print Size: 9.5 x 7.5
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File Size: 2 M

MultimediaPhotos

Van Allen Probes: From the Applied Physics Laboratory to Kennedy Space Center

The photos here chronicle the April 30-May 1 voyage of NASA's twin Van Allen Probes from Building 23 of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md. to Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The spacecraft, packed securely into their round white transportation containers, were taken from the thermal vacuum testing area at APL and loaded onto a flatbed trailer. At about 10:30 p.m. on April 30, they were driven to Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, where they were loaded onto a USAF C-17 cargo plane and flown south to Florida. After landing at 7:54 a.m. at Kennedy Space Center on May 1, the probes were unloaded from the jet and driven to Astrotech Space Operations, just outside the gates of Kennedy. There, the spacecraft were unloaded and prepared for the integration and testing of their systems and instruments. These activities lead up to final preparations for stacking the spacecraft and launch aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket on August 30, 2012. All photos: JHU/APL

Click on the images below to view a larger version.


Environmental Testing

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Environmental Testing

Engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., prepare to place Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft "B" in a thermal-vacuum chamber, where they can make sure the propulsion system will stand up to the range of hot, cold and airless conditions RBSP will face in outer space. This round of testing took place in late October-early November 2010.

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Format: JPG
Print Size: 6 x 9
Resolution: 300 dpi
File Size: 1,700 K

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Environmental Testing

Engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., prepare to place Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft "B" in a thermal-vacuum chamber, where they can make sure the propulsion system will stand up to the range of hot, cold and airless conditions RBSP will face in outer space. This round of testing took place in late October-early November 2010.

Download Hi-Res Image
Format: JPG
Print Size: 6 x 9
Resolution: 300 dpi
File Size: 1,570 K

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

Environmental Testing

Engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., prepare to place Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft "B" in a thermal-vacuum chamber, where they can make sure the propulsion system will stand up to the range of hot, cold and airless conditions RBSP will face in outer space. This round of testing took place in late October-early November 2010.

Download Hi-Res Image
Format: JPG
Print Size: 8 x 6
Resolution: 300 dpi
File Size: 1,450 K

MultimediaOther Media

Logos

Van Allen Probe Logo

Downloads:

White Background (JPG)

Black Background (JPG)

Transparent Background
(PNG)

Education Poster

Downloads:

Printable 5-Page Activity Version of the Poster
(PDF, 1.42 MB)

Poster (22x17) (PDF, 1.51 MB)

Poster Package (ZIP, 22.4 MB)

Wallpaper

To use these as desktop images:

  1. Click on the screen resolution you would like to use, in the proper format for your monitor or screen (fullscreen is more square, widescreen is more rectangular).
  2. For PC: right-click on the image; for Mac: control-click; select the option 'Set as Desktop Background' or 'Set as Wallpaper' (or similar).

Array Deployment

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Separation

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Single RBSP

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Twin RBSP

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NASA Logo Van Allen Probes Logo

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